Sir Edward Taihakurei Durie student essay competition sponsored by the Māori Law Review

Tell us about the most significant legal development affecting Māori in the past year and be in to win an iPad Mini.

2017 competition - the most significant legal development affecting Māori in the past year

Entries are welcomed for the 2017 Sir Edward Taihakurei Durie student essay competition sponsored by the Māori Law Review.

Can you bring to our readers' attention the most significant legal development affecting Māori in the past year?

Are you an undergraduate law student enrolled at a New Zealand tertiary education institution and interested in this competition? Or do you know someone who should enter this competition?

The competition is open until 5 p.m. Friday 6 October 2017.

Competition details are set out further below on this page.

Earlier competition winners

The Māori Law Review has published previous winning essays. To see this work follow these links:

  • Monique van Alphen Fyfe, an undergraduate law student at Victoria University of Wellington, won the 2015 competition. Her essay published in February 2016 is about reform of Te Ture Whenua Māori Act 1993 (the Māori Land Act 1993).
  • Anna Brenstrum, an undergraduate law student at Otago University, won the 2014 competition. Her essay published in February 2015 is about the public works litigation involving Patricia Grace and the New Zealand Transport Agency.
  • Laura Hardcastle won the 2013 competition. Laura is a law student at Victoria University of Wellington. Laura's prize-winning essay addressed the proposed settlement of claims about the Whanganui River by the establishment of Te Awa Tupua. The settlement will recognise the river as a new legal entity - Te Awa Tupua.
  • Laura Lincoln, a law student at Victoria University of Wellington, won the Sir Edward Taihakurei Durie essay competition in 2012. The competition was open to undergraduate law students at the Faculty of Law, Victoria University of Wellington. Laura's winning entry about the case Takamore v Clarke [2011] NZCA 587 was published in the Māori Law Review in February 2013.

Dr Carwyn Jones congratulates Monique van Alphen Fyfe on her winning essay

 

 

 

 

 

Background information on the essay competition

The topic is the most significant legal development affecting Māori in the past year. Essays can be up to 2500 words in length.

The competition is open to undergraduate law students enrolled at New Zealand tertiary education institutions.

Entrants can adapt something written for their coursework and submit it as an entry so long as it has not been published previously.

How to enter

Entries must be:

  1. Received by Māori Law Review by the due date - 5 p.m. Friday 5 October 2017;
  2. Submitted by email to carwyn.jones@maorilawreview.co.nz;
  3. Accompanied by a statement that the essay is the entrant's own work;
  4. Previously unpublished (although the essay can be adapted from coursework you have already completed);
  5. Accompanied by a statement that the entrant is a current undergraduate law student enrolled at a New Zealand tertiary education institution; and,
  6. Accompanied by a statement that the entrant gives permission for his or her essay to be published by the Māori Law Review in print and online formats if it is selected as the winning essay along with accompanying publicity of the winner.

How we will select the winning entry

The winning essay will be:

  1. Chosen by at least two of the Māori Law Review's consultant editors;
  2. Announced approximately two weeks after the competition closes; and
  3. Published subsequently in the Māori Law Review.

What the winner will receive

The author of the winning essay will:

  1. Have his or her essay published in print and online formats by the Māori Law Review;
  2. Share copyright in the published form of the winning essay with Māori Law Review Limited; and
  3. Receive an Apple* iPad Mini (16GB wifi).

Conditions

The following conditions apply to this competition:

  1. Entrants must follow the instructions above on how to enter this competition;
  2. Entries will be acknowledged by email;
  3. The decision of the judging panel will be final. No correspondence will be entered into about the judges' decisions or how this competition operates;
  4. The winner will be announced at http://maorilawreview.co.nz;
  5. Copyright in the published form of the winning essay will be shared equally with Māori Law Review Limited;
  6. Any decision about republication of the winning essay will be taken by Māori Law Review Limited;
  7. The author of the winning essay consents to participate in publicity and promotion for the Māori Law Review to promote the results of this competition, including photographs of the winner and online and print publicity;
  8. Entrants agree to the Māori Law Review sending, in its discretion, further communications to them by email about this competition, any subsequent similar competition, and marketing information about the Māori Law Review; and
  9. Entries will not be returned to entrants.

* Note

As sponsor of this competition, Māori Law Review is supplying the prize of an Apple iPad Mini. Apple Pty Ltd is not a sponsor of this competition.