Matua Rautia: the report on the Kōhanga Reo claim

Matua Rautia: the Report on the Kōhanga Reo Claim

Waitangi Tribunal (Wai 2336, 2012)

The Waitangi Tribunal has released its report Matua Rautia: the report on the Kōhanga Reo claim. The report deals with a number of issues about the state of te reo Māori in kōhanga reo (Māori language preschools) and the Crown’s obligations to support the kōhanga reo movement and language revitalisation.

Download Matua Rautia: the report on the Kōhanga Reo claim here (4.45 MB PDF). read more

Control over whānau taonga

Jones v Wickliffe

High Court [2012] NZHC 1960

7 August 2012

The parties disputed who had rights to possession of two kakahu (feather cloaks) as whānau taonga (treasured family heirlooms).  The Court dismissed the defendant’s application to strike out the plaintiff’s claim that she was entitled to possession of the kakahu.

Download Jones v Wickliffe [2012] NZHC 1960 here (99KB PDF). read more

Māori rights in water – the Waitangi Tribunal’s interim report

The Interim Report on the National Freshwater and Geothermal Resources Claim

Waitangi Tribunal (Wai 2358, 2012)

Do Māori have commercial proprietary interests in water protected by the Treaty of Waitangi?

If yes, will the sale of up to 49 per cent of shares in State-owned power-generating companies affect the Crown’s ability to recognise those rights and remedy their breach?

These questions have been before the Waitangi Tribunal these past few months.  On 24 August 2012, the Tribunal found that Māori still have residual proprietary rights in water and the Crown will breach the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi if it goes ahead with the intended share sale.

Download the Stage 1 Report on the National Freshwater and Geothermal Resources Claim here (4.8 MB PDF). read more

Immigration decisions and the Waitangi Tribunal; spouses as taonga

Memorandum-Directions of the Deputy Chairperson declining an urgent inquiry into the Immigration Issues (Kumar) Claim

Waitangi Tribunal (Wai 2320, #2.5.3, 8 May 2012)

The Waitangi Tribunal declined to convene an urgent inquiry into a claim that removal from New Zealand of a person under immigration processes would amount to a breach of the Treaty of Waitangi because that person was regarded as a taonga by his wife’s family.

Download Wai 2320, #2.5.3 here (579 KB PDF). read more

Ko Aotearoa Tēnei – genetic and biological resources in taonga species

Ko Aotearoa Tēnei (A Report into Claims Concerning New Zealand Law and Policy Affecting Māori Culture and Identity)

Waitangi Tribunal (2011 Wai 262)

Overview

Ko Aotearoa Tēnei – This is New Zealand/Aotearoa is the long awaited report of the Waitangi Tribunal on a number of claims about law and policy affecting Māori culture and identity.

Māori Law Review co-editor Carwyn Jones has written a series of posts examining the major sections of this substantial Tribunal report.  In the fourth post in this series, Carwyn sets out the Tribunal’s views on genetic and biological resources in taonga species. read more

Ko Aotearoa Tēnei –Taonga and the Conservation Estate

Ko Aotearoa Tēnei (A Report into Claims Concerning New Zealand Law and Policy Affecting Māori Culture and Identity)

Waitangi Tribunal (2011 Wai 262)

Overview

Ko Aotearoa Tēnei – This is New Zealand/Aotearoa is the long awaited report of the Waitangi Tribunal on a number of claims about law and policy affecting Māori culture and identity.

Māori Law Review co-editor Carwyn Jones has written a series of posts examining the major sections of this substantial Tribunal report.  In the sixth post in this series, Carwyn sets out the Tribunal’s views on the conservation estate and taonga. read more

Ko Aotearoa Tēnei – Te Reo Māori

Ko Aotearoa Tēnei (A Report into Claims Concerning New Zealand Law and Policy Affecting Māori Culture and Identity)

Waitangi Tribunal (2011 Wai 262)

Overview

Ko Aotearoa Tēnei – This is New Zealand/Aotearoa is the long awaited report of the Waitangi Tribunal on a number of claims about law and policy affecting Māori culture and identity.

Māori Law Review co-editor Carwyn Jones has written a series of posts examining the major sections of this substantial Tribunal report.  In the seventh post in this series, Carwyn sets out the Tribunal’s views on the Māori language – te reo Māori. read more